New Drug Offers Hope to Sufferers of Premature Ejaculation

According to statistics published in the Journal of the Medical Association in 1999, around 30 percent of men consider that they ejaculate too quickly during sex. If this is indeed the case, premature ejaculation is by far the most prevalent male sexual dysfunction. Of course, this can be a pretty subjective issue – what might seem like a sprint to one man may seem like a marathon to the next.

Most sex therapists agree however, that the ‘normal’ time frame between penetration and ejaculation is between two and ten minutes. In fact, an official definition of premature ejaculation published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine in 2008 states that sufferers usually climax within a minute or so of penetration and that the condition causes significant anxiety and concern.

If you are one of these men, you may be interested to know that a new medication has just hit the market. The drug, branded Priligy (known by the pharmaceutical name Dapoxetine) is the first drug of its kind to be specifically developed and licensed for the treatment of premature ejaculation. Presently, Priligy has been granted licenses in a number of EU countries including Germany, Sweden, and Italy; and most recently in the UK. At the time of writing, the drug is still awaiting approval by the FDA for marketing in the US – although it can be purchased online.

Priligy only has to be taken when needed, 1-3 hours before sex, and according to clinical trials can increase the length of sex by up to three times.

In a preliminary study published in the international medical journal The Lancet in 2006 for example, the effectiveness and safety of Priligy was examined in a 12 week trial involving over 2600 sufferers of premature ejaculation. Those given a placebo showed little improvement in ejaculatory control; whilst those given the new treatment increased the time they took to ejaculate from an average of 0.91 minutes to 3.32 minutes. In fact, five clinical trials testing the effectiveness of Priligy on over 6000 men in total in the last few years have all shown similar results.

Priligy is specifically designed to be taken as and when required, as opposed to every day. According to research published in the urology journal BJU International in 2008, the drug is both fast acting and is then quickly eliminated from the body within 24 hours – therefore preventing any potential build up of toxicity in the body. Reported side effects of the drug are relatively mild but include nausea (8.7% of men), headache (5.9%) and dizziness (3%). However, given the short acting nature of Priligy, these potential adverse side effects are short lived.